Alva Noë somehow made his book better by commenting on my review of it…

Several months ago, I posted an article titled “Horribly disappointed by a really good book,” in which I reviewed Alva Noë’s book Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness. In retrospect, it was a strange review, fraught with all the mixed feelings hinted at … Continue reading

I Will Sell You The Mars Trilogy

I highly suggest you commit whatever time it takes to read the 1800 or so pages in the Mars series by Kim Stanley Robinson, an award winning science fiction epic published in three parts, beginning with Red Mars in 1993. Kim Stanley Robinson delivers what has rightly been called “hard science fiction.” It is a … Continue reading

The perspective of time, galaxy formation and Conway’s Game of Life.

It’s commonly known that a fresh perspective on an old topic can bring new insights.  Only recently, though, have I thought about changing the perspective of time as a way to gain these insights. There seems to be an internet phenomenon these days where a piece of music is stretched over an interval much longer … Continue reading

Times are a changin’

So at the moment, there are 100,000 neurons connected to the robot through Bluetooth. It is living, it’s in an incubator at 37 degrees centigrade. We have to feed it every couple of days with minerals and nutrients. It actually excretes, we have to clear away waste products and whatnot. It is living material, living … Continue reading

World Wide Mind

Michael Chorost is a technology theorist with an unusual perspective: his body is the future. In 2001 he went completely deaf and had a computer implanted in his head to let him hear again. This transformative experience inspired his first book, Rebuilt: How Becoming Part Computer Made Me More Human, in which he wrote about … Continue reading

Music and Neurons

The embedded video is inspiring for many reasons, most of which will become apparent on viewing. What is so incredible to me is how a musician (Bobby McFerrin) could go to a conference aimed primarily at scientists and blow every mind in the room with such a simple demonstration. I defy anyone to watch it … Continue reading

How Engineers Learn from Evolution

One of the objectives of The Ever-Blurring Divide is to show examples of a larger trend in which technologies are increasingly being modeled after aspects of nature. At the time of posting, this talk, given by Robert Full, was already several years old and the technologies demonstrated had been replaced by newer generations. Nevertheless, I … Continue reading

Richard Feynman and our changing understanding of the universe.

I suppose it’s obvious to say, but the thing that makes the universe so interesting is all the unknown.   As our set of human knowledge broadens and becomes more intricate, the leading edges of it’s expanding border are a place of excitement. A while back, I bookmarked a youtube clip of physicist Richard Feynman … Continue reading

Us Now

As we tend to mention on this site quite frequently, modern communications are altering our ways of life in a variety of incredible ways. One thing we always try to focus on when we talk about this stuff is how new all this stuff is. In the grand scheme of things, all this wonderful, technological … Continue reading

Science, Religion, and the Over-valuing of Words: A letter to two friends.

By John Dave, the other day you were mentioning how you felt a little uncomfortable with Eckhart Tolle’s term, ‘pain-body’ and it reminded me of my own struggles with Tolle. I can’t remember if I mentioned this or not, but in the past, I’ve felt the same unease about said term and even occasionally at … Continue reading